Monday, 10 July 2017


Ear - the runic Irminsul


I would like to share some ideas regarding  the relationship between the Anglo-Saxon Ear rune and the Irminsul. Many folk associate the Irminsul with the Tyr rune and there is a runic aspect to the Irminsul which connects it with Tyr, however I've come to see the Ear rune as the runic Irminsul. The Ear rune itself contains the Tyr (Tiw) rune but with a bend in the arms.

The term Ear derives from the Anglo-Saxon rune Ear, meaning grain or corn (the common English name for wheat). The word varied in English with the Northumbrian term being æher. What we find is that the word Ear has a parallel with Germanic words for Honour. Though I don't think the words directly cognate it shouldn't come as surprise when the term 'Aryan' mean't someone who ploughed the land, as well as 'noble' and 'honour'. 

Wheat - Honour

Dutch
Aar -   Eer  

German
Ähre - Ehre

The root word is the Proto-Germanic *akhuz which comes from the PIE word *ak-  and this means to 'be sharp', or to 'rise out/up to a point'. Both the Ear rune and Tiw rune have this central point which rises up. It is also a fitting description of a Sword - and we find a connection here to the Ar-Kan Rune Lag rune Cweord, which means Sword. The Ar-Kan rune Cweord rune has the same form as Anglo-Saxon Ear rune.

Both Tiw (Tyr) and the Saxon god Irmin are Sword gods just as they are gods of the World Pillar or Irminsul.

In the emblem of the 24th SS unit Karstjäger we can see the symbol of a Tyr-rune inspired Irminsul but one that has a hilt running across the centre - suggestive of a handle, thus a sword. The unit used a Tyr rune as most of their soldiers came from South Tyrol.