Saturday, 24 September 2016

Reflective runes

There are a number of runes which have a line of symmetry running down the middle. The rune is thus comprised of two runes facing each other which together creates a reflective rune. Along with these 'reflective' runes, in the various rune-rows we can see some runes are 'branch' runes (and not surprisingly these often represent trees) and we also have runes with a rotational aspect.   

Now, we have a synchronicity here. I was originally going to post an article to accompany the previous article on the Ehwaz rune - then the latest copy of the Woden's Folk magazine arrived with almost the same article within it. So I'll use aspects of both Wulf's article and my own post to demonstrate the reflective aspect of the Ehwaz rune.


Here we have the Ehwaz rune - which represents the White Horse. The rune also symbolises companionship and trust - thus it is used to represent marriage, and we can see in the rune the image of a couple holding hands.  At the same time with can see how the rune is formed by two Laguz runes. Laguz is connected to water, and its the root of our word lagoon. But Lag is also the root of the words lay and law - as used in our own Ar Kan Rune Lag. The word 'lay' has three meanings - one is to lie, as in to lay down - and can also mean 'to sleep with'. The second refers to a lay-man (a term borrowed by the christian church but originally any man not in a legal profession). It is also the root of the Germanic term 'lie' - which is a song.     

Guido von List viewed marriage as sacred. And whilst I value the importance of marriage - I also share the view that Himmler held - that children should born into a loving family, that a woman doesn't need to be a wife on order to be a good mother. Still, the National Socialist passed many laws requiring government officials be married as part of working for the NSDAP.  This union of man and wife, whether married or not, is certainly a sacred Germanic law. In fact if we look at many of the totem animals of the Germanic and Northern lands - we find that even they mate for life. Wolves, Owls, Eagles, Swans for example.  

So in this rune of marriage (Ehwaz) we can see aspects of the rune of law and 'laying' (sleeping with). Thus a deeper understanding of the rune develops.  


In this example we see the Daeg rune which means Day. Many volk see the rune as symbolising a sand timer, which makes sense.  We can also see how the rune is two reflecting Thorn runes. The Thorn rune is the thorn (needle) that sent Sleeping Beauty to sleep. The German for 'Sleeping Beauty' is  Dornröschen which is itself a word play on Rose Thorn. Thus one Thorn sends you to sleep and the other thorn  is a to awaken you. My youngest daughter has a small ritual hammer called 'Thorn of Awakening - with runes carved into the handle which invoke this idea.  A complete day in Germanic lore would have started at sun-down, so our days would have started when we went to sleep, but Daeg or Dagaz is also the root of Dawn (Anglo-Saxon dagung, Danish dagning).


The Odal rune- one of our most recognisable runes. We use this rune to symbolise our faith in Blood and Soil. However the rune is also the rune of Woden as the Hooded Man - and the version on the right in the colours of Black, White and Red represent the Mysteries of the Hooded Man prophecy. The Hooded Man holds the balance of light and dark, thus in this image we can see two Sieg runes facing. The rune is the lightning flash and its reverse is the Black Light - as seen on the Schwarze Sonne. Od which is the root of Odal, is hidden within the Hood - the Red Hood of Woden. Thus the rune is outlined in red. Within the rune is a Red Ing rune- representing the god Ing. This is a very complex rune, and the Hooded man mysteries are better described on the Woden's Folk websites. But once again we can see how a rune can revile a deeper mystery when viewed in this way.






Friday, 23 September 2016

Well, yesterday wasn't just the equinox - it was also my wedding anniversary! I still use the red cord used at my handfasting to decorate my ritual hammer. Guido von List used the Ehwaz rune to symbolise the marriage. It's easy to see how the rune can represent this union. A couple standing next to each other, holding hands.  Today the tradition family is under constant attack, for the tradition family - the father, mother and children - represent all that is wrong in the minds of those who seek our end - yet study after study show that the happiest people are those in stable relationships. 

Marriage is the root of the Aryan race! - Guido von List


Thursday, 22 September 2016

Monday, 12 September 2016

I'd like to write a little about the Yr rune as I was recently thinking about the World Tree and its connection to the various trees, namely the Ash, Yew and Oak. One thing that is often debated is what kind of tree is the Yggrasil? Many claim it is an Ash, others a Yew, some will say its an Oak and so on. Truth is it is probably all of these, and more.

I often use the Yew tree as symbolism for the Yggdrasil, and if we look at the runes connected to the Yew, I see aspects of the Yggdrasil within them.

The Armanen Yr rune (commonly seen as a death rune) is a Yew rune- and symbolises the roots of the World Tree.

The Eoh rune - The Yew rune - this represents the growth of the Yew tree. It is also the basis of the Wolf-Hook, which is a symbol of Ull (Wuldor) who resides in Yewdale, which I believe is the Yggdrasil.

But recently I've been thinking about the Anglo-Saxon Yr (Yew bow) rune. Meditating on the rune (as pictured below) I saw the Ur rune, which is the basic shape of the rune but with an Irminsul inside. This matches the shape of the Yr rune. And whilst the Irminsul was clear - the Ur rune shape was not. It was much more rounded and at first I though it could be the Bifrost bridge, but it soon became clearer and it was the skull of the giant Ymir. Ymir's skull was used to create the dome of the heavens, and the name Ymir contains the name Yr. This only furthers my belief that the Yggdrasil is a Yew tree. Ymir was the first being - thus the Ur (Original) rune shape. 


The rounded version of the AS Yr rune which appeared as the Skull of the giant Ymir (Yr) and Irminsul








Here in this picture of Adam and Eve we find numerous references to the Irminsul. This 'Tree of Life' clearly resembles the Irminsul - indeed this is exactly what the Irminsul is - the Tree of Life or Yggdrasil. coiled around the trunk of the Tree is the snake from the biblical tale of Eve being corrupted but this again is just christianity appropriating more pagan symbolism - in the form of the Staff of Asclepius, which itself can be compared to the caduceus. Above the Irminsul is the symbol for Ares. Ares or Eres is a another name for Irmin.

Monday, 22 August 2016

Some more thoughts on Blood and Soil

I'd like to explore another aspect of Blood and Soil - some ideas concerning the word Boden. Boden is the German word for soil - and it was used in Anglo-Saxon times, spelt Bodan. The root of this word is very interesting, for the Proto Indo-European word is *bhu(n)d(h) which also gives us words like bonde (Swedish and Norwegian for farmer). The farmer represents the mystical link between Blood and Soil.

Many years ago at a Woden's Folk moot a Wodenist kinsman gave a fascinating talk on using divining rods to find water underground, and he used them to trace a lay line which ran through the site of the Wayland Smithy (England). No one really knows how or why the rods work, but it was clear that they did - which was evident from simply witnessing the talk and demonstrations. The explanation given as to how they could work is that they act as an extension to the body and simply give a clearer indication to certain thoughts or feelings that have become lost in modern man. In fact the Wodenist who demonstrated the rods often went around barefoot and it was his belief that the connection his skin had with the earth made using the rods easier.

Now recently whilst reading up of the origins of the word Boden I stumbled across something which backs up this idea. Many folk will already know that the nerve endings in your feet are connected to many other parts of the body - as can be seen in the diagram below. But the root of the word Boden, or *bhu(n)d(h) gave the Irish their word Bond - which means the sole of the foot. The word also cognates with the English word bottom via the Saxon word botm. This meant the bottom or lowest part.  Thus rooted in this term we get the idea of Soil, the farmer and the sole of foot all being connected.  No doubt many farmers in our earliest history would have worked barefoot. But by doing so their bodies may have been able to detect certain 'energies' or magnetic forces within the Earth - an ability with have lost today, thanks wearing rubber soled shoes. The fact that we only use 10% of our brain may show that we have lost these skills. It is widely believed that early man instinctively knew which way was north, as the Pineal gland was more active in early man. I also believe that rural living and a closer connection to the soil can affect your perception of time. Things are often slower out in the sticks! The city has always been home to a fast paced lifestyle - fast food, the rush hour etc. This is why revolts against authority have always started in rural areas - as folk who live in the cities do not notice the changes that are occurring in front of them.